Friday, 5 May 2017

Towards a brighter future

The series of complications little Rana was born with were unnerving for her young parents Rabba and Mohsin Humaid of Oman. The joy of her birth turned to despair when Rana was diagnosed with corneal infection and glaucoma, coupled with chest infection and hypothyroidism. With support from the Government of Oman, the worried parents contacted Dr Bhupesh Bagga at LVPEI for medical advice. 

Looking at the severity of the problem, they were advised to fly down to Hyderabad immediately. In January 2017, when Rana was brought to LVPEI her condition was extremely fragile with fluctuating levels of para thyroid hormone and aspiration pneumonia. Unfit to be operated upon, the first priority was to bring her vital signs to normal level. After receiving treatment at one of the city based pediatric hospitals, Rana underwent corneal surgery in both her eyes at the tender age of 9 months. 

“She now responds to light and is curious to see things around her. For us this whole journey has been nothing less than a miracle. We will forever be thankful for the wonderful support we have received from the entire team at LVPEI,” say the delighted parents. To keep her eye pressure controlled, drops have been prescribed and for better vision, the parents have been trained to fit contact lens in her left eye.

So that nobody goes needlessly blind

Bhikari Nayak, 90, and his wife Sasi Nayak, 70, from Dulanapur, Banki, Odisha were treated at Shri Mithu Tulsi Chanrai Campus in Bhubaneswar for cataract. When they did not turn up for their post operation check-up, a concerned Dr Nadim Kazi informed Kirteemayee Roul from the patient care team. 


With no contact phone number or detail mentioned except their village in the patient record, Kirteemayee requested another old patient from the same village to inquire about the couple. The patient got back to say that the couple lived in abject poverty, and could not afford their prescribed eye drops leave alone travel to the institute for their check-up. 

Dr Kazi and Antaryami Muduli from the nursing team went to their house and escorted them back to the campus. In absence of proper care, Sasi's eyes had developed mild edema and congestion. Medical treatment was begun immediately and a second surgery performed. 

On the day of discharge, Dr Kazi gave them Rs 500 from his pocket and asked them to come for their follow-up without fail. The institute applauds the dedication of the team that went beyond their call of duty.

Friday, 7 April 2017

Dear Dr Sangwan,

I worked at Srujana Centre for Innovation as an LVP-MITRA fellow for 6 months until January 2017. It was a turning point in my life. Before coming to Srujana, I was ambiguous of what to do in life. But at Srujana, looking at how my knowledge and expertise could impact the lives of people, I realized my true passion.

Though an amateur, I wanted to fly, learn more, visit new places and meet new people. But I lacked confidence about not studying in a good university and lacking experience. I took a chance and applied for a fellowship at Harvard Medical School. Luckily, I got through. They loved my work and wanted me to participate in the ongoing research. I had a hard time convincing my parents as it would need a lot of money. But your advice and guidance helped me a lot. I am now working closely with professors and clinicians at MEEI for developing vision aids for low vision patients. I am having a wonderful time working here, learning new things and improving my knowledge.
I want to thank you very much for your support and guidance. I feel very lucky to have met you in my life.

Nish Mohith Kurukuti

Laxmi and her family will now lead a better life

Laxmi Konda, 27, was living a marginalized life with two children and her mother-in-law. Married young, losing her husband to an unknown illness, and her own impoverished look, led people around to suspect her of being HIV positive. Routine community screening by Vision Technician S Laxman indentified Laxmi’s younger child with a vision problem, and possibly Laxmi too. He brought the family to the secondary centre at Adilabad, Telangana for a detailed examination where both were diagnosed with cataract. Laxmi confessed to having reduced vision since childhood. Fellow doctor Prabhakar Singh and Centre Administrator Naresh Rao counselled Laxmi for her fear of surgery, which she finally underwent – after a blood test ruled out HIV.  She was overjoyed on finally being able to see what her children looked like. Her daughter is currently under medication to stabilize her haemoglobin levels for her surgery at LVPEI’s Hyderabad campus.

Monday, 13 March 2017

Regaining vision, and dignity

A failed cataract surgery in the right eye and a gradual diminution in vision in the other eye, had made Pratima Barik, residing in Nayagram, West Bengal, completely dependent on her husband. Expensive medical treatment being beyond their reach, she visited Shri Mithu Tulsi Chanrai Campus at Bhubaneswar with hope and was diagnosed with 'Fuchs endothelial dystrophy', a condition in which the cells present in the cornea do not secrete adequate fluids necessary for clear vision. It generally affects the elderly population and is slightly more common in women.


A corneal transplant surgery, along with cataract surgery in the left eye, was successfully performed. Her vision in the left eye has now significantly improved. “I am extremely delighted I can now lead a dignified life and can contribute equally to the family,” says Pratima Barik.

No more blinded for life

When Rathod Shyam, 40, a registered medical practitioner (RMP) had conjunctivitis, he tried treating it with antibiotic drops. To ease the burning sensation, he applied cow's milk and ghee. Within days, his condition worsened, his vision dropped completely and his eyes were covered with a white layer. He consulted a local eye specialist near his village in Maharashta and was devastated when told that he was blinded for life. A former LVPEI Vision Technician advised the family to take Rathod to LVPEI's Seshanna Chennawar Eye Centre in Adilabad, Telangana.



Dr Prabhakar Singh, fellow ophthalmologist posted at the centre, examined the white layer that seemed like severe inflammation due to milk and ghee. Rathod's eyes were cleaned and he was prescribed medication. Overwhelmed at receiving his eyesight back, Rathod says, “In spite of being a medical practitioner, I was ignorant about how vision threatening home remedies can be! I now pledge to create awareness among other people in my village.”

Monday, 6 February 2017

Little Pruthvi is the eyes of his parents

Like other children, Pruthvi enjoys going to school and playing. But unlike other 4-year olds, Pruthvi helps his parents with mundane tasks at home, a happiness that his family has secured thanks to the parents' vigilance.

Congenital cataract and delayed care had caused vision loss for Pruthvi's parents. Aware of the high risk involved, they had brought their baby over for a detailed eye check, right after his birth, and at the tender age of 6 weeks, Pruthvi had undergone a successful cataract surgery at LVPEI's Vijayawada campus.

The happy parents now no longer depend on Pruthvi's grandparents or uncle to escort them to the hospital for check-ups. “We now have Pruthvi to help us around,” they proudly say.

“It   is  indeed  inspiring  and  motivating  to  see  how  timely  medical intervention  can  change the  lives  of a child and his family as well,” says Dr Niranjan K Pehere.