Wednesday, 3 January 2018

“My experience at LVPEI has been an eye opener in the true sense."

“My experience at LVPEI has been an eye opener in the true sense.
I never realized how important our eyes were until I was affected with severe corneal damage after my cataract surgery, which took away my right eye vision. Despite undergoing a series of surgeries and the best of efforts by doctors in my hometown, I did not regain vision. Simple things such as climbing stairs or walking around independently became a challenge. Highly recommended by my doctor, I came to LVPEI along with my husband. Right from the security personnel to the patient care staff and the doctors, everybody has been extremely courteous and never made us feel that we are in a foreign land. All my fears and anxiety were put to rest by Dr Muralidhar Ramappa's assuring statement – 'You don't worry ma'am. We will take care of you.' And indeed, he did! Post the surgery I have regained functional vision in my right eye. It feels so good to see things clearly again.”

Maureen Chisenga
Malawi, Africa


(Ms Chisenga underwent anterior segment reconstruction combined with selective corneal replacement.This resulted in dramatic visual improvement in her vision and discomfort in the eye.)

Rizwana is no longer a burden to her family

SK Rizwana Begum was just 16 when she got married and lost her vision due to complications from an early pregnancy. Abandoned by her husband, she returned to her parental home. A community based rehabilitation program organized by LVPEI at her village in Kannuru, Krishna District, AP marked the beginning of her journey back to physical, social and economic rehabilitation. 
Thanks to the field service officer P Adilakshmi's persistent efforts, Rizwana's parents eventually agreed to her training in mobility and orientation, Braille, money identification and home management. She went on to clear her 10th grade exams, is now training on using low vision and assistive devices at LVPEI's Vijayawada campus, and has since joined Andhra Loyola College in Vijayawada. Rizwana is now determined to complete her education, secure a job for herself and support her family.

Monday, 4 December 2017

The joy of Giving

''My friend and I organized a bake sale during Diwali to raise money for non paying surgeries at LVPEI. Neha was the baking expert and I was the manager. It was a lot of hard work but when we came to the hospital and met the people in the Institute's rehabilitation centre, we realized everything was worth the time and effort. We are planning on doing some more bake sales in future. We experienced happiness in giving, and hope others can too."

Nitya

Gauri can now live a life of dignity

Before the surgery Gouri Behera, 32, from Dhenkana District, Odisha, was born with limited vision in only one eye. Even that deteriorated over time, and her eye ball gradually shrunk. When she came to LVPEI Bhubaneswar, she had no vision at all. Dr Vivek Warkad and Dr Suryasnata Rath performed a series of surgeries comprising 'hangback extraocular muscle recession' and 'fixation of the globe to the bony wall'. 

The team successfully managed to restore not only her vision, but also the shape of her eyeball, thus improving the overall cosmic appeal of her face. It is indeed a life changing experience for Gouri who is now able to see the world, and live a life of dignity and hope for a better future.

From being a patient to becoming a vision ambassador

Ravula Munaiah, 52, used to earn his living by repairing recorders and radios, until his vision began dwindling. Being single and handicapped by polio, he became completely dependent on his relatives. An LVPEI Vision Guardian referred him to Secondary care Swarna Bharat Eye Centre in Nellore where he was subsequently operated for cataract in both his eyes. Extremely happy with the vision outcome, he actively participated in the community screening program organized by the LVPEI team in his village, and personally counseled those who were advised surgeries. Encouraged by his advocacy, many from his village visited the centre for follow-up treatment. “I can once again see everything and that is a very big thing for me,” says Munaiah.  

Tuesday, 7 November 2017

My daughter Jahnavi

“My daughter Jahnavi was born with a series of life threatening complications – congenital heart problem, cataract and rubella. The doctors in my village were reluctant to operate her. When I met the experienced and efficient team of doctors at LVPEI Visakhapatnam, I knew my baby was in safe hands. She was just 27 days old when the first surgery for cataract removal was performed by Dr Merle Fernandes, supported by the anesthetist team. Her right eye was too small for the intraocular lens to be fit in, so she was prescribed contact lens. This resulted in improved vision but later she developed squint, followed by lazy eye. Things were not easy; no good school was ready to admit her. To my utter happiness, Dr Virender Sachdeva successfully treated her eye problems. Today Jahnavi goes to a good school and I am proud to share that she is doing very well. Our journey with LVPEI has been just amazing and I will be ever thankful to her treating doctors and the entire staff.”

M Sridevi

Amalapuram, East Godavari, AP

Changing Destiny

Mohammed Fareed, 30, was born with blue eyes and steadily started losing his vision. Despite undergoing surgeries at a local eye hospital, he could not regain his vision. The family lost all hope and he turned into an introvert. Fate intervened and brought them in contact with a patient who had been treated at LVPEI for a similar problem. Fareed's mother, for the first time, stepped out of their village in Krishna District, AP and came all the way to Hyderabad. Dr Sunita Chaurasia evaluated Fareed and performed keratoplasty (corneal transplantation) in both eyes. 


It's been over a year now and the family is overjoyed with Fareed's vision. They now spread awareness about the treatment to others in their community. “The benefits of keratoplasty to cure corneal blindness are not known to many in the remote areas and they consider it as their destiny and live with the problem. We thank our patients who have been ambassadors in spreading the message about the treatment available and thus helping to support our mission – so that all may see,” says Dr Chaurasia.